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Surgical versus non-surgical management of abdominal injury

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There is a lack of evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) for the use of surgical over non-surgical interventions such as observation for the management of people with abdominal trauma.
There is uncertainty about the best management approach (surgical and non-surgical) for abdominal injuries. …

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Physical interventions to interrupt or reduce the spread of respiratory viruses

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There is some evidence to suggest that some low cost and simple interventions such as hand washing would be useful in helping to reduce the transmission of epidemic respiratory viruses. Implementing transmission barriers, isolation and hygienic measures are effective at containing respiratory virus …

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Zinc supplementation as an adjunct to antibiotics in the treatment of pneumonia in children 2 to 59 months of age

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There is insufficient evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to support the use of zinc as an adjunct to antibiotics in the treatment of pneumonia in children aged between 2 and 59 months.
Acute respiratory infections particularly pneumonia, are responsible for high mortality in …

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Specially formulated foods for treating children with moderate acute malnutrition in low- and middle-income countries

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There is moderate to high quality evidence on the effectiveness of lipid-based nutrient supplements and blended foods for treating children with moderate acute malnutrition. Although, lipid-based foods were associated with increased recovery rates compared with blended foods; lipid-based foods  did not  reduce mortality …

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Surgical versus conservative interventions for treating fractures of the middle third of the clavicle

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There is insufficient evidence on the effectiveness of surgical versus conservative treatments for acute middle third clavicle fractures. Treatment options must be chosen on an individual patient basis, after careful consideration of the relative benefits and harms of each intervention and of patient …

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Ready-to-use therapeutic food for home-based treatment of severe acute malnutrition in children from six months to five years of age

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There is insufficient evidence from clinical trials on the effectiveness of home-based ready to use therapeutic food (RTUF) in comparison to the standard diet on clinical outcomes of recovery, relapse and mortality in children with severe acute malnutrition. Either RUTF or flour porridge …

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Antibiotic prophylaxis for preventing burn wound infection

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There is some evidence from RCTs suggesting that the use of silver sulfadiazine when used directly on the burn is associated with significantly increased rates of infection and longer length of hospital stay compared with dressings or skin substitutes. However, studies were at …

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Corticosteroids for pneumonia

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There is still insufficient evidence on efficacy and safety of corticosteroids in patients with pneumonia. The current available evidence suggests that corticosteroids in patients with pneumonia are usually helpful in accelerating the time to symptom resolution.
The use of corticosteroids is associated with …

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Antibiotics for community acquired pneumonia in children

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The evidence from RCTs on the effectiveness of various antibiotics for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in children varies. For the treatment of patients with CAP in ambulatory setting, amoxycillin can be used as an alternative to co-trimoxazole. The limited data available on other antibiotics …

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Antibiotics for community-acquired pneumonia in adult outpatients

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There is insufficient evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on the efficacy of various antibiotic treatments in patients who are older than 12 years of age with a diagnosis of  community acquired pneumonia (CAP).
CAP is associated with very high mortality and …

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