Interventions for treating femoral shaft fractures in children and adolescents

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There is insufficient evidence on the benefits and harms from the independent comparisons of surgical and non-surgical interventions for treating femoral shaft fractures. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence on whether long term function as an outcome differs between the surgical and conservative interventions of thigh bone fractures in children and adolescents. However, evidence from the comparison between surgical and conservative treatment shows that surgery resulted in low rates of malunion although it may be associated with serious adverse events. Similarly, internal nailing may help speed up recovery.

Femoral shaft fracture, although uncommon, are serious injuries that affect the quality of life of both the children and their carers which may result in long term morbidity. The treatment, often in-hospital care, of the femoral shaft fractures range from surgical fixations to conservative treatment associated with prolonged immobilisation. The aim of this review was to assess the benefits and harms of interventions for treating femoral shaft fractures in children and adolescents.

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