Tag archive for Protection

Hurricane Katrina 10 years later: a qualitative meta-analysis of communications and media studies of New Orleans’ Black community

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The environmental community rarely prioritizes a race-based analysis in environmental protection topics. There is a lack of representation by people of colors in leadership positions in engineering, media, science, law, advocacy and humanitarian response …

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Evacuation from natural disasters: a systematic review of the literature

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Female gender, younger age, and white ethnicity were demographic factors most commonly associated with evacuation. The presence of children was also associated with increased evacuation. More prospective and methodologically rigorous research is needed to …

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New York State public health system response to Hurricane Sandy: An analysis of emergency reports

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Post-disaster emergency reports should be reviewed systematically as they better our understanding of successes and areas for improvement. Future work should focus on collecting feedback from a broad net of public health and service provide staff in order to improve planning …

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No calm after the storm: a systematic review of human health following flood and storm disasters

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Floods and storms have differing effects on human health. There is a lack of data on the health effects of floods alone and on long-term effects.
A systematic review of 113 studies in a global range of countries (23 on floods, 89 …

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Identifying and describing the impact of cyclone, storm and flood related disasters on treatment management, care and exacerbations of non-communicable diseases and the implications for public health

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Disasters have a significant negative impact on the health of people with non-communicable diseases. Future work should aim at assessing all the factors that influence direct and indirect (preventable) morbidity and mortality related to non-communicable diseases (NCDs) during and after disasters. …

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Climate change, extreme weather events, and us health impacts: what can we say

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There is a cumulative uncertainty in forecasting characteristics of extreme events driven by climate change. This prevents accurately predicting the future impacts of hurricanes, wildfires, and extreme precipitations and floods in the United States …

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A systematic review of the international disaster case management literature in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina

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Better connections between the emergency management and international social work communities will be needed in the face of future large-scale disasters like Hurricane Katrina. Better linkages between these communities are needed to improve disaster …

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The impact of hurricanes on mechanisms of burn injury

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Burn injuries can occur as people are attempting to recover from the aftermath of a hurricane. Educational programs should specifically target hurricane-related burn dangers and hazards.
A literature review was carried out to examine the …

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Enhancing resilience to coastal flooding from severe storms in the USA: international lessons

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In low-income countries such as Cuba and Bangladesh, warning systems and effective shelter and evacuation systems, combined with high levels of disaster risk reduction and education, social cohesion, and trust between authorities and vulnerable communities can help to increase resilience to …

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In the eye of the storm: Resilience and vulnerability among African American women in the wake of Hurricane Katrina

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There are special challenges that African American women faced following Katrina, which suggests that the effects of a natural disasters can also be socially constructed. Governments and other groups responsible for disaster preparation and …

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