Volunteer and internship opportunities

Evidence Aid: Volunteer and internship opportunities

What is Evidence AidRegistered as a charity in 2015 but with its roots going back to 2004 within Cochrane, Evidence Aid uses knowledge from systematic reviews to provide reliable, up-to-date evidence on interventions that might be considered in the context of natural disasters and other major healthcare emergencies. Evidence Aid seeks to highlight which interventions work, which don’t work, which need more research, and which, no matter how well meaning, might be harmful; and to provide this information to all those who are planning for, or responding to, disasters or humanitarian crises. The Evidence Aid website provides two types of evidence – a resource library of systematic reviews, and topic-based  collections of evidence from systematic reviews, all free at the point of use where possible. Evidence Aid works with publishers to try to make pay per view articles free from the Evidence Aid website.

Where: We would expect you to be able to work from home via the internet.

When: Anytime. Interns are expected to be available for a minimum of three months with a committed number of hours. Volunteers can work part-time from home and can be more flexible with time commitments.

What is expected: You should be familiar with conducting literature reviews and desirable would be experience with the full knowledge of what a systematic review is, their methodology, and why they are important. If you do not feel you have this knowledge, you can volunteer to help with other things such as developing the website, working through lists of systematic reviews to see which are of relevance to the humanitarian sector, and social media streams (as examples). You should be passionate about raising awareness of the importance of evidence-based decision making, particularly in the humanitarian sector, and liaising with NGOs, government officials, and academics. You will have to be comfortable not receiving a salary, as Evidence Aid currently does not have a budget for interns, although Evidence Aid would be happy to help put together a funding proposal.

What would be involved? Identifying and summarising systematic reviews to add to collections of evidence for humanitarian aid work. You can see the current collections here. You can either contribute to updating an existing collection, or propose starting your own collection on any topic relating to humanitarian aid work in a regional or global context. Or you can identify systematic reviews in your area, summarise them, and add them to the resources library.

What are the benefits? Learning from world-leading academics, having the opportunity to attend conferences and relevant events, and being invited to present a summary of your work in Evidence Aid’s annual report. You are also welcome to submit your literature reviews as abstracts for conferences -and Evidence Aid staff will support you in creating the poster/presentation.

Would you like more information?

Contact Claire Allen

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