Education interventions to improve healthcare workers’ adherence to Standard Precautions for the control of health care-associated infections

Citation: Moralejo D, El Dib R, Prata RA, et al. Improving adherence to Standard Precautions for the control of health care-associated infections. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2018; (2): CD010768

What is this? Standard Precautions, including using personal protective equipment (PPE) or adhering to safe handling of needles are essential for the prevention and spread of infections, such as COVID-19, in healthcare settings (e.g. hospitals and nursing homes).

In this Cochrane systematic review, the authors searched for research evaluating educational interventions to improve adherence to Standard Precautions by healthcare workers. They did not restrict by date, type or language of publication and did their searches in February 2017. They identified 4 individual randomized trials, 1 individual randomized trial with a crossover design, 2 cluster-randomized trials and one non-randomized trial (total: 673 participants), but there was considerable variation in interventions and outcome measures used, and in the certainty of the evidence.

What works: Education with visualisation of respiratory particle dispersion probably improves healthcare workers’ use of facial protection.

Peer evaluation probably improves healthcare workers’ adherence to Standard Precautions.

Checklists and coloured cues probably improve healthcare workers’ adherence to Standard Precautions.

What doesn’t work: Nothing noted.

What’s uncertain: Education with additional infection control support may slightly improve healthcare workers’ adherence to Standard Precautions.

Some other types of education may slightly improve healthcare workers’ adherence to Standard Precautions and their level of knowledge.

 

Disclaimer: This summary has been written by staff and volunteers of Evidence Aid in order to make the content of the original document accessible to decision makers who are searching for the available evidence on the coronavirus (COVID-19) but may not have the time, initially, to read the original report in full. This summary is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians, other health workers, professional associations, guideline developers, or national governments and international agencies. If readers of this summary think that the evidence that is presented within it is relevant to their decision-making they should refer to the content and details of the original article, and the advice and guidelines offered by other sources of expertise, before making decisions. Evidence Aid cannot be held responsible for any decisions made about the coronavirus (COVID-19) on the basis of this summary alone.

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