Healthcare workers’ willingness to work during an influenza pandemic

Citation: Aoyagi Y, Beck CR, Dingwall R, et al. Healthcare workers’ willingness to work during an influenza pandemic: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 2015; 9(3): 120–30

What is this? COVID-19 is placing a great strain on healthcare workers. Previous research has examined how their willingness to work is affected during an influenza pandemic and might suggest points of intervention to increase willingness to work during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In this systematic review, the authors searched for cross-sectional surveys of healthcare workers’ willingness to work during an influenza pandemic. They did not restrict their search by date of publication but did limit to articles published in English. They did their search up to April 2013. They identified 43 studies from 11 countries (including 21 studies from the USA).

What was found: On average, healthcare workers’ willingness to work during an influenza pandemic was moderately high but widely variable (range: 23% to 96%).

Factors significantly associated with higher willingness to work during an influenza pandemic were being male, being a physician or nurse, full-time employment, perceived personal safety, awareness of pandemic risk and clinical knowledge of influenza pandemics, role-specific knowledge, pandemic response training, and confidence in personal skills.

Childcare obligations were significantly associated with decreased willingness to work during an influenza pandemic.

What’s uncertain: Estimates for willingness to work were highly variable and depended on context. There was inconsistency in how respondents in the studies included in the review were asked about their willingness to work.

 

Disclaimer: This summary has been written by staff and volunteers of Evidence Aid in order to make the content of the original document accessible to decision makers who are searching for the available evidence on the coronavirus (COVID-19) but may not have the time, initially, to read the original report in full. This summary is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians, other health workers, professional associations, guideline developers, or national governments and international agencies. If readers of this summary think that the evidence that is presented within it is relevant to their decision-making they should refer to the content and details of the original article, and the advice and guidelines offered by other sources of expertise, before making decisions. Evidence Aid cannot be held responsible for any decisions made about the coronavirus (COVID-19) on the basis of this summary alone.

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