Infection control strategies for preventing the transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in nursing homes for older people: uncertain if they are effective

Citation:  Hughes C, Tunney M, Bradley MC. Infection control strategies for preventing the transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in nursing homes for older people. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013; (11): CD006354

What is this? A variety of infection control strategies are used for infectious diseases, such as meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The findings of this research may be worth considering for reducing the transmission of COVID-19.

In this Cochrane systematic review, the authors searched for a variety of types of research into strategies for preventing the transmission of meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in nursing homes for older people. They did not restrict by date, type or language of publication and did their searches in August 2013. They identified 1 cluster-randomised trial (32 nursing homes), which evaluated the effect of an infection control education and training programme on MRSA prevalence in residents and staff, and on adherence to infection control standards.

What works: Nothing noted.

What doesn’t work: Nothing noted.

What’s uncertain: The effects of infection prevention and control strategies to prevent the transmission of MRSA in nursing homes are uncertain.

 

Disclaimer: This summary has been written by staff and volunteers of Evidence Aid in order to make the content of the original document accessible to decision makers who are searching for the available evidence on the coronavirus (COVID-19) but may not have the time, initially, to read the original report in full. This summary is not intended as a substitute for the medical advice of physicians, other health workers, professional associations, guideline developers, or national governments and international agencies. If readers of this summary think that the evidence that is presented within it is relevant to their decision-making they should refer to the content and details of the original article, and the advice and guidelines offered by other sources of expertise, before making decisions. Evidence Aid cannot be held responsible for any decisions made about the coronavirus (COVID-19) on the basis of this summary alone.

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