» Neonates/infants

Is Dengue vector control deficient in effectiveness or evidence?: Systematic review and meta-analysis

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There is currently scarce reliable evidence on the effectiveness of any Dengue vector control strategy.
Dengue is the most widespread mosquito-borne arboviral disease and vector control methods are the main approach to prevent it. This study reviewed the evidence for effectiveness …

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Congenital cerebral malformations and dysfunction in foetuses and newborns following the 2013 to 2014 Zika Virus epidemic in French Polynesia

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There was insufficient evidence to associate cerebral malformations or dysfunction without microcephaly to Zika virus infection.
 An unusual increase in annual congenital cerebral malformations, brainstem dysfunction and severe microcephaly among foetuses and new-borns was observed after the 2013 – 2014 Zika …

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The value of educational messages embedded in a community-based approach to combat Dengue Fever: A systematic review and meta regression analysis

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Evidence suggests that the effect of educational messages embedded within community-based approached was most effecting about 18 to 24 months after it was delivered but then subsequently declined.
Prevention of Dengue relies on mosquito control. The mosquito, Aedes aegypyti (which also causes …

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Evidence in humanitarian emergencies: what does it look like?

Marie McGrath mosque_Cover picture for slider

By Jeremy Shoham and Marie McGrath, ENN
Over 20 years, ENN has published Field Exchange to help achieve our purpose of strengthening the evidence and know-how for effective nutrition interventions in countries prone to crisis and high levels of malnutrition. It provides the experiences of those implementing nutrition …

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Supplementary feeding for improving the health of disadvantaged infants and children: what works and why?

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Effective implementation ensures that children receive supplementary foods as planned, and that programmes are tailored in the context of their needs as well as those of their caregivers.
The objective of the realist review, done alongside this systematic review, was to determine the mechanisms …

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A systematic review of refugee women’s reproductive health

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There is a lack of evidence on how best to identify and deter negative reproductive health outcomes of resettling refugee women, associated with their migration experience, in comparison to their non-refugee counterparts.
Refugee women experience numerous challenges to their health whilst in …

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Cash-based approaches in humanitarian emergencies

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Cash transfer and voucher programs, if appropriately designed and managed, can be effective and efficient modalities for addressing the needs of crisis-affected populations in a range of contexts. Robust evidence on the effects and efficiency of cash-based interventions are strongest for food …

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Oral iron supplements for children in malaria-endemic areas

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Oral iron supplementation or fortification for children living in malaria-endemic countries, in a daily dose of 80% or more of the recommended daily allowance for prevention of anaemia by age, does not cause an excess of clinical malaria. This is probably true …

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Systematic review of the evidence on the effectiveness of sexual and reproductive health interventions in humanitarian crises

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Humanitarian crises increase vulnerability to poor sexual and reproductive health (SRH) outcomes among affected populations through reduced access to services and supplies, damaged health facilities, depleted human resources, increased exposure to sexual violence, and increased impoverishment and related risk-taking. The aim of …

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Evidence on the Effectiveness of Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene (WASH) Interventions on Health Outcomes in Humanitarian Crises: A Systematic Review

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Water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) professionals operating in humanitarian response must deliver interventions ranging from safe and sufficient drinking water provision to efficient wastewater and excreta removal methods in extremely unstable and insecure contexts (e.g., temporary sites with shifting water tables). This …

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