» Neonates/infants

Intermittent versus daily therapy for treating tuberculosis in children

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Evidence from four randomised trials was insufficient to determine that the use of daily drug treatment was more effective than intermittent (twice- or thrice-weekly) treatment for children with tuberculosis.
Childhood tuberculosis is a neglected global public health problem. Rifampicin-containing drugs given daily for …

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Routine vitamin A supplementation for the prevention of blindness due to measles infection in children

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No evidence was found to investigate whether vitamin A can prevent blindness in children infected with measles.
Annually 500,000 children become blind worldwide, 75% of them living in low-income countries. Measles infection in children has been associated with vitamin A deficiency and …

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Disaster and perinatal health: a systematic review

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This was a systematic review of 49 peer-reviewed studies on the effects of disaster on pregnancy and the postpartum period. The identification of women at high risk and who may be more vulnerable, in particular in respect to mental health, after a …

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Dilute versus full strength formula in exclusively formula-fed preterm or low birth weight infants

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The available evidence on the reduction in time taken for infants to attain an adequate energy intake as a result of use of dilute formula is based on three small low quality studies. No evidence was reported on outcomes such as …

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Combined and alternating paracetamol and ibuprofen therapy for febrile children

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There is some evidence to support the use of alternating and combination therapy compared with monotherapy alone at reducing temperatures in children with a fever. However, on the outcome of child discomfort, the evidence still remains unsatisfactory. Furthermore, there is insufficient evidence …

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Community-based supplementary feeding for promoting the growth of children under five years of age in low and middle income countries

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There is insufficient evidence to support the community-based supplementary feeding for promoting the growth of children under 5 years old in developing countries. This is because of the scarcity of available studies and their heterogeneity, which makes it difficult to reach any firm …

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Intermittent iron supplementation for improving nutrition and development in children under 12 years of age

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There is evidence to suggest that intermittent iron supplementation when compared to placebo or no intervention, is effective in reducing the risk of anaemia in children ≤12 years of age. However, daily supplementation is more effective than intermittent iron supplementation in preventing and …

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Delayed introduction of progressive enteral feeds to prevent necrotising enterocolitis in very low birth weight infants

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There is evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) suggesting that delayed introduction of progressive feeding beyond four days after birth is not associated with increased risk of developing necrotising enterocolitis in very preterm, very low birth weight infants and growth restricted …

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Nasal versus oral route for placing feeding tubes in preterm or low birth weight infants

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There is insufficient evidence on the effect of nasal versus oral replacement of enteral feeding tubes on growth and development, food tolerance, or incidence of adverse events in low birth weight or preterm babies. One small trial found no evidence of …

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Lay health workers in primary and community health care for maternal and child health and the management of infectious diseases

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Lay health workers may provide benefits in promoting immunisation uptake and breastfeeding, improving tuberculosis cure rates, and child health when compared to usual care. There is insufficient evidence to draw any conclusions for other health issues.
Lay health workers (LHWs) are widely used …

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